A history of Italian’s and their coffee

*exert taken from Nellositaly.com

Some argue that the Enlightenment took place in eighteenth-century Europe because, simply, that’s when coffee houses first opened. What does that make the Enlightenment? Just one major caffeine buzz. It’s true, Italians love their coffee and have so ever since the coffee bean first arrived at the ports in Venezia, brought from the Islamic world in the sixteenth century. They have it first thing in the morning, typically espresso or cappuccino; have it after lunch; perhaps a quick shot during the work day; then one after dinner before taking the ritual “passeggiata,” or stroll, through the city center. Every household has the famous “macchinetta,” an easy-to-use stove-top percolator made of aluminum and first built in 1933 by Bialetti that, when properly used, produces a delicious espresso at any time. No matter the occasion, coffee must be done right in Italy. It’s an art, and there’s no kidding around about the perfect espresso: rich, creamy, perfectly balanced from start to finish, not one coffee ground burned by the scorching hot, high-pressure water that passed over it. And what about those massive, gorgeous espresso machines you see in fine coffee shops in the United States, certainly all over Italy? We can thank Luigi Bezzera for them! In fact, we can thank him for the espresso itself.

tumblr_nzf6gxzgsS1uw6frmo1_540Some Italians–in fact, many Italians–have one bar (Italian coffee houses are known as “bars”) they frequent every day for their coffee. It’s there where they talk sports and politics. It’s there where they start their day and, at times, end it with an aperitivo, a before-dinner drink (perhaps just after-work drink!). A barista–he or she who prepares the coffee–is revered in Italy. Though some Italians have a preferred bar where they get their coffee, some also have a preferred barista. There’s something to be said about that special barista who can pull that perfect espresso. Thank you, baristi of Italy–of the world, for that matter–for waking us all up and keeping the conversation going!

Coffee: do Italians do it better?

Here are a few snippets from an interesting article done by the BBC (http://www.bbc.com/news/business-33527053)

Written 13 August 2015)


 

As far as I’m concerned, the cappuccinos, lattes and espressos served in branded coffee chains taste scorched and bitter, a shabby imitation of the real thing.

But am I missing the point? Is my palate so provincial that it hasn’t caught up with the changing tastes of the global coffee market? Because it appears that not only has Italian coffee been taken out of Italy, but the Italian is also being taken out of the coffee.

The International Coffee Organization says that globally consumption has grown by nearly 42% since the beginning of this century. So we’re drinking more of it than ever before, which explains the expansion of many coffee chains in the past few decades, but we’re not drinking it in the Italian way.

“I think a caricature of Italian espresso was what was exported,” says award-winning barista James Hoffmann of London’s Square Mile Coffee Roasters. He’s part of a generation of highly-trained baristas driving innovation in the sector through more sophisticated espresso-based brews.

“Global espresso culture is now a long way from what is considered traditional Italian espresso,” Mr Hoffmann says.

Coffee by numbers

8.5bn kilos of coffee is consumed globally every year

50% rise in global coffee production since 1990

  • Finland has the highest per capita coffee habit at 11.4kg
  • Italians drink much less per year consuming 5.8kg
  • In the UK we are relatively light coffee drinkers at 2.8kg
  • Finland has the highest per capita coffee habit at 11.4kg
  • Italians drink much less per year consuming 5.8kg
  • In the UK we are relatively light coffee drinkers at 2.8kg

You’d never, for example, ask for a latte in Italy. If you did, you’d get served a glass of milk. Neither would you ask for an espresso at a bar; “un caffe” is all you need to say. Coffee and espresso are synonymous in Italy.

Then there’s the Australian “flat white”, a halfway house between a Starbucks-style latte (25-35ml espresso shot topped by large amount of hot milk) and a macchiato (25-35ml espresso shot and a drop of hot, usually foamy, milk). The “flat white” has gone global, so much so that recently it replaced the cappuccino on Starbucks’ menu in some parts of the US.

What’s more, Italians don’t lounge around in coffee shop armchairs sipping cappuccinos while browsing the internet. Instead they perch at the marble-topped counters of Italy’s ubiquitous bars – not cafes – and throw back “un caffe” on the go.

James Hoffmann
Image captionJames Hoffman says we’re drinking a “caricature” of an Italian espresso

Still, when it comes to taste and brewing style, Italy is trying to reclaim ground. The Italian Espresso National Institute or INEI was set up to protect Italian-style coffee drinking.

“International chains of cafes are spreading, calling the coffee they serve Italian espresso,” writes INEI’s chairman Luigi Zecchini on the organisation’s website. But, “behind our espresso… there is a unique and unrepeatable culture.”

INEI is even offering certificates to those who do it the “right” (for that read: Italian) way.

Are they fighting a losing battle? “Good roasting techniques and good cup-tasting protocols are becoming more and more international,” says Jeremy Challender of London’s Prufrock Coffee, another award-wining barista.

You can hear him teaching me how to make the perfect cup of coffee if you click here.

In any case, many top baristas also turn their noses up at what’s served in branded coffee chains.

Square Mile Coffee’s Mr Hoffmann says it’s all down to the way the beans are roasted. Many chains roast their coffee darker which gives it a bitter flavour. Roasting lighter can achieve a more complex taste, but get it wrong and the coffee tastes sour.

“I think the theory is likely that consumers’ tolerance for bitterness is higher than their tolerance for sourness,” Mr Hoffman says.”Hence the larger companies are erring on the side of caution.”

two cappuccinos
Image captionCappuccinos are a morning coffee in Italy

But it also comes down to the raw beans themselves, and on this front Italy doesn’t fare as well as many speciality coffee shops outside of the country.

Part of the problem is with the price of “un caffe”. Most Italian bars will not charge more than one euro a cup.

“Such a low ceiling means the raw coffees in Italy are generally a little more commoditised, and there isn’t the option to purchase more high quality coffee,” Mr Hoffmann adds.

Italian flavour is held back too by the way the coffee is brewed. Bars there have a typical dose of around 7 grams of ground coffee per espresso, with very little variation. Speciality coffee shops will often use a lot more coffee – from 8 to 20 grams for a single espresso – yielding a more intense coffeeas a result.

That may be, but I still think I’ll be sticking to home-brewed coffee from my trusted moka machine. And I’ll continue to drink it the Italian way.

That means a short, sharp shot of espresso in the morning, perhaps even after dinner, but certainly no cappuccinos after 11am or any milk-based coffees after a meal. It doesn’t agree with the digestion. Every Italian knows that.

 


 

CAFFÈ BORBONE BLU for the Monday blues

Mondays bring with them an exhaustible amount of blues – but we have you sorted! Our CAFFÈ BORBONE BLU.

One of our favourites is a Neapolitan Roasted Arabica with the perfect amount of Robusta. The composition of this ESE pod has resulted in a deliciously rich Espresso that is balanced with a mild acidity.

Pod_Borbone_Blue
Medium roast 70% Arabica, 30% Robusta

Caffe Borbone Espresso pods are customized for pod machines and porta filter machines only – E.S.E pods (Easy Serving Espresso). No grinding, no measure of the ground coffee and no mess. E.S.E pods are the easiest way of making a superb Espresso (Coffee, Cappuccino) with the benefits of a hassle free preparation and perfect results such as a thick crema at the right temperature.

Caffè Borbone is a long established roaster in the Naples region. The balance and flavour of their coffees will confirm that the traditional roasting ethos is still very much intact. Caffè Borbone is roasting and blending coffees for over 28 years.

4 REASONS WHY ITALIAN COFFEE IS THE BEST COFFEE

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It’s an eternal fact that Italian coffee is the best form of coffee. Why?

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It’s pretty evident that Italians have been passionate about espresso for hundreds of years and perhaps the the rest of us are just merely trying to ‘catch-up’.

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It is undeniable that the passion, expertise and love is apparent in every delectable sip of Italian-made coffee – and it’s because they just get it. Italians have mastered the process of coffee-making and have therefore perfected the espresso.


Fun fact:

Ernesto Valente produced the first pump driven espresso machine in the 1960’s. This design concept remains the cornerstone for contemporary espresso coffee machines.

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On the most part, Italians tend to drink coffee in its purest form – that being Espresso. Espresso is merely one short black shot of coffee and therefore gives you no chance to cover-up a poor espresso coffee with milk, cream or sweeteners. So Italians therefore take great care in delivering  the perfect, organic espresso.

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Through every sip, us South Africans are merely the beneficiaries of hundreds of years of experience, expertise and this particular Italian passion for the perfect espresso.

To order your Italian coffee machine or ESE coffee pods, head on over to our online shop!

CAFFÈ BORBONE RED

This ESE pod delivers a magnificently strong and resolute taste. Its full body taste is the result of the dark roasted Robusta and has a deliciously intense aftertaste. This coffee is for real Neapolitan Espresso lovers.

miscela_rossa
Composition: 100% Robusta

Our  selection of Caffe Borbone Espresso pods are customised specially for ESE pod machines – E.S.E pods (Easy Serving Espresso). This means that there’s absolutely no grinding, no measuring of the ground coffee and no mess. E.S.E pods are the easiest way of making a superb Espresso, Coffee or Cappuccino – with the joy of a convenient  preparation and the right temperature means it has perfect results such as a thick crema.

Caffè Borbone is a long established roaster in the Naples region. The balance and flavour of their coffees will confirm that the traditional roasting ethos is still very much intact. Caffè Borbone is roasting and blending coffees for over 28 years.

Price: only R4,30

Click here to view it on our online store!

LUCAFFE BLUCAFFE E.S.E POD

Price: Only R8.00


lucaffe_blucaffe6
The espresso which seduces, every time.

Blucaffe is a combination of the greatest passion, flavor and of course secrets of Gian Luca Venturelli. It is an enigmatic mix of various beans from tropical plantations at high altitudes, where some extraordinary coffee diversities are produced and then merged in this perfect blend.

Espresso for us is more than a pleasure, it must create an emotion and good memories.

Composition:
Our Secret!


We are proud to be an eco-friendly company !

We have chosen paper for our pods. Paper pods are totally biodegradable, unlike plastic capsules which unfortunately are spreading as an alternative standard. Paper pods enable us to produce healthier coffee. Filter paper is particularly effective in reducing the presence of grounds and other coffee residues such as waxes and oils. It is also used in pharmaceutical applications because it traps waterborne bacteria and reduces impurities. And the coffee, besides being more eco-friendly, is also healthier and more digestible.

Coffee and fashion: the perfect combination.

It’s no secret that coffee-drinkers are fashionable, trendy and stylish.

How do you espresso yourself? We looked at a few coffees and made the assumptions ourselves!


Single Espresso

You want to be Parisian cool and are always on the run. Your outfits are simple and organised but always well accessorised. You’re all about the outfit’s trend factor and love to be in style. Your Chanel handbag is your prized possession.

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Double Espresso

You have a meeting in the next hour. You rushed out the door this morning and still aren’t sure exactly what you’re wearing.

coffee-fashion-girl-tea-Favim.com-163451

Triple Espresso

You have a deadline in less than 30 minutes and have been awake since 4am. You’re in your favourite sweats and have no makeup on.

coffee-fashion-girl-glamour-hair-photography-Favim.com-73779

Cappuccino

The presumably “fancy order” that has a certain no-nonsense retro chic to it. You dress in Country Road, aspire to holiday in Rome and read Penguin Modern Classics.

coffee-break

Instant Coffee

White, two sugars. You’re dressed in your work clothes and your Woolworth’s pencil Skirt is your go-to outfit piece. Black is your favourite colour to wear.

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Decaff

Get out.